Wednesday, April 25, 2012

South Charlotte Target remodel underway

Target is remodeling its store at Blakeney Shopping Center on Rea Road to add an expanded fresh grocery selection, and expects the project to be complete by the end of June.

The store is one of the last in the area that haven't already had the fresh food facelift. Target has been pushing expanded fresh grocery selections for several years now, in an attempt to win shoppers from rivals such as Wal-Mart and drive more frequent shopping trips from existing customers.

The Rea Road store (called "Charlotte Far South" on the Target store remodel website) is one of 90 being remodeled in the latest fresh grocery renovations. Target has already converted almost 1,000 of its 1,765 stores to the new format, which includes another 10,000 square feet of space for groceries. They include fresh produce, packaged meats and packaged baked goods, along with the traditional dry food and frozen coolers.

The renovation also includes wider aisles, lower displays, an updated beauty aisle and a reconfigured shoe department in hopes of spurring more spending.

Data from Chain Store Guide, a company that collects market share data, shows Target is still a comparatively minor local grocery player, with 1.3 percent of Charlotte area grocery sales. It's the 11th-largest grocery retailer locally. Wal-Mart is the largest, with 21.5 percent of the market, followed by Harris Teeter, with 21.1 percent.

Here's an earlier story I did with Kathleen Purvis about Target's grocery program, which was originally called P-Fresh.


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21 comments:

Anonymous said...

Really? This is a "job"? Writing about stores?

Ely Portillo said...

Well, I suppose it is.

Anonymous said...

I hate suburbia.

Anonymous said...

The remodel was completed in March. Both Stonecrest and Blakeney have the update...

Jillian Mullen said...

This Target store actually completed its remodel a month ago. It began the day after Christmas and ended in March. It doesn't have produce or much meat, though, because of the Harris Teeter in the same shopping center. It looks beautiful regardless!

Anonymous said...

Mr Portillo, remember you lost a lot of support for your articles when you started deleting everyone's comments and then allowing others that you thought were more suitable. Whether you 'can' or not is irrelevant. It's just the way the Observer does it, right? If you don't like what people are saying, just delete all of it and or ban comments. You USED TO BE one of the few that we all thought was fair when it came to comments. No longer.

WashuOtaku said...

I still prefer the Super Targets compared to the expanded Target stores. The layout is simplier and provide the most items compared to the later.

Anonymous said...

Yes, anonymous, it is. IF you would understand that these stories that are written regarding changes in retail in the Charlotte market for those that want to know the new and coming opportunities. Plus, for all of the capitalists out there, it reports on the changes taking place driving spending and spending habits. So, essentially, Ely's stories are part business, part human interest.

Anonymous said...

re anonymous 7:52am

Really, This is an existence? Making snide, meaningless comments on a news site.

Anonymous said...

Who is the general contractor for the project?

ScottCLT said...

@Anon 7:52: You know, he writes other articles too. This is just his blog. And as a bit of a development geek myself, I find his information about new stores interesting and follow it daily. If it's not your cup of tea, just don't read it.

Timmy said...

I hate suburbia, tear it down.

Ghoul said...

There is a great, big sign on the side of the building saying the remodel is complete. Come on Eli, would it have hurt to actually go to the store?

Ely Portillo said...

Hey guys,
First of all, I'm sorry about the remodel apparently being complete. The announcement Target sent out gave June 24 as the completed-by date, so either someone's really far ahead of schedule or someone mixed a date up. As for driving down there, I live about 20 miles from Blakeney, so a quick spin by doesn't really work. This blog is the smallest part of my work responsibilities, so I typically try to finish it as quickly as possible each day to give me time for larger stories (such as today's US Airways earnings/merger talk, which I'm writing about). That being said, I understand why you're frustrated, and I'm sorry.

Regarding the comment about comments (meta-comment?), I did change the format of commenting to require moderation before posting. I did that after the flood of racist rants that was consuming each and every post on here, especially grocery-related posts, for some reason. I still allow about 9 out of 10 comments, if not more, and only delete those with racist language, obscenities, and personal threats against other commenters. I'm not perfect, and I wish I didn't have to screen comments, but I felt like I was left with no choice after some of the stuff that was getting on here. I hope everybody has a good Wednesday and the sun comes out,
Ely

Anonymous said...

This is one of my favorite blogs, along with some of the links you have listed in your blogroll like Sky City Southern Retail Then and Now, Grocerying and Live Malls. I love reading about the news and development activity happening around the region... Keep it up, Ely.

Michael said...

Ely - Please keep doing what you are doing. Most of us understand that a 200 word blog post is not an investigative journalism piece that a writer has spent months researching. In regard to the comments, I'm surprised the Observer even allows them on any story at all. They deteriorate into something representative of the worst of humankind within the first 5 comments no matter what the story is. Story: Hot Air Balloons Spotted in Matthews. Comments: "F hot air balloons. It's Obama's fault. It's still Bush's fault. Minorities did it. Immigrants should go back home. Why was this story written? I hate the Observer."

Man, it gets old.

Ghoul said...

Eli,

How about a story on the Toys R Us moving in Gastonia? I remember going there as a child myself, so they were in that location for some time. I wonder why they moved, the building wasn't perfect, but the location right off 85 was a good one.

Anonymous said...

Ely, maybe you can answer this- I am curious as to how they are doing, having groceries at Target when you have Harris Teeter right next door - both in Stonecrest and Blakeney

Anonymous said...

The Target Stonecrest has produce/meat etc and there is a Harris-Teeter there. Why does Target Far South not have the same "Fresh Grocery" update - instead they have candy bars and wine bottles on the intended banana/produce display area - or is more work being done?

Ely Portillo said...

Hi Anon 6:34. I don't have any data on how those specific stores are doing, but I don't believe Target's intent in doing this overhaul of their chain is to compete directly with traditional grocery stores for full-on shopping trips. But a lot of non-traditional grocers are focused on food right now, especially dollar stores like Family Dollar and mega-retailer Wal-Mart. Food drives people to the store more regularly than anyone else, so if you want to get people in the store, food is a great thing to improve and expand. Target is largely trying to drive traffic for "fill-in" trips, that Wednesday evening, on the way home from work drive where you realize you need milk and eggs. If there are no milk and eggs and bananas in Target, you'll skip them and go to HT every time. If there are milk and eggs and bananas in Target, maybe you'll stop in there. And maybe while you're there, you'll pick up some higher-margin items too. In these still-uncertain economic times, they're trying to get more people in the door. And if they drive more traffic, they'll get a bigger share of shopper's wallets. Maybe the groceries will help grow their average basket size from regular shoppers as well.

Edward Thirlwall said...

Fresh poultry, groceries and other wet foods, need proper storage methods in order for them to remain fresh throughout their shelf lives. Therefore, it is necessary for all stores to constantly review their store design layout in order to provide ample space to accommodate the storage arrangements. Extra costs are going to be incurred but for the sake of their customers, they need to do so.